Course Test   

Business NameFUNERAL DIVISION C O E CONTINUING EDUCATION

 

  • Title :
  • CEU Number :
  • Date :
  • CEU CREDIT
    • 5 hr BEREAVEMENT AFTERCARE .MN FUNERAL
    • FIL204
    • 08/19/2019
    • 5 hours

     

  • State :
  • MN

  • Test    
      
    1.The concepts of aftercare and grief counseling are relatively new and have become specialized fields of attention only in the past fifteen to twenty years as understanding and recognition of "normal" grief processes have been studied and written about.?
    True   False
    2.Dictionary definitions of "aftercare" offer a medical model, explaining the term as the treatment of a convalescent patient, such as would be utilized following surgery.?
    True   False
    3.In the death and dying profession, “aftercare” is defined as any post death or post funeral program of survivor rehabilitation designed to help the individual through the grief process and successfully readjust to his or her environment.?
    True   False
    4.Although the term “rehabilitation” continues to imply pathology, its purest meaning involves restoring or learning new habits that promote a useful and healthful life.?
    True   False
    5.In preindustrial societies, higher death rates meant that many people died at what we would consider relatively young ages, interrupting their role in society.?
    True   False
    6.Grief counseling involves those interventions which help persons experiencing normal grief to deal with the tasks of mourning in order to complete these within a reasonable time frame.?
    True   False
    7.While religious affiliations and spiritual beliefs will vary in both content and relative importance from one grieving person to another, the clergy play an important role in bereavement, as it is generally assumed they “understand” these matters better than the average person.?
    True   False
    8.The ADEC takes an active role in educating the public on death-related issues and sponsors an annual conference with leading professionals and researchers.?
    True   False
    9.The ADEC was formed in 1976, and its members include, among others, educators, funeral directors, social workers, psychologists, nurses, nuns, rabbis, physicians, hospital volunteers, and hospice personnel.?
    True   False
    10.Given the current fragmentation of aftercare delivery, it is incumbent upon those attempting to provide quality programs and care to examine the credentials, philosophies, and references of organizations offering such materials or programs before committing their own (or their clients’) time and money.?
    True   False
    11.Nonverbal communication accounts for about two-thirds of our communication.?
    True   False
    12.Proxemics examines the use of space or distance between people.?
    True   False
    13.We send more nonverbal messages with our faces than any other means, and the face usually reveals the highest accuracy of all nonverbal messages.?
    True   False
    14.Paralanguage examines the tonal areas of the verbal message.?
    True   False
    15.In times of bereavement, power seems missing, and this can show up through the eyes.?
    True   False
    16.The clothing people choose to wear can reveal their station in life, their values, and their opinions of the funeral occasion.?
    True   False
    17.A person’s hand gestures may serve as an indicator of anxiety during crisis.?
    True   False
    18.Body position presents us with a subtle but powerful way to observe nonverbal messages. At times you can almost see the burden a person carries by the bend of the body.?
    True   False
    19.A defensive person reaches a premature conclusion. Statements like “I know what you are going to say ...” or “It has been our normal experience that ...” can preface this behavior.?
    True   False
    20.Your words usually have either a building effect or a destructive effect. To establish a strong relationship, you want to use constructive words.?
    True   False
    21.Making the transition—from a world with the deceased in it, regardless of what that means or how it manifested, to a world without the deceased—is the ultimate goal of mourning.?
    True   False
    22.Aftercare can take different forms, including bereavement programs sponsored by funeral homes, state-regulated hospice bereavement programs, support groups, and self-help groups.?
    True   False
    23.American society encourages the quick fix, exhorting those who suffer a loss to “put it behind you and get on with your life.” Such attitudes discount the bereaved’s very real grief, and can contribute to a sense of isolation.?
    True   False
    24.Parkes (1987) identified three major categories of bereavement aftercare: (1) professional, (2) self-help and/or support groups, and (3) hospice (a combination of professional and trained volunteers).?
    True   False
    25.Support groups “have predetermined outcomes and a strong separation between helpers and supporters” (Klass 1985, p. 354).?
    True   False
    26.Self-help groups are largely self-governing and self-regulating, emphasizing peer solidarity rather than hierarchical governance.?
    True   False
    27.Professional services are generally those provided by a psychiatrist, psychologist, licensed professional counselor, or social worker who is specially trained in working with the bereaved.?
    True   False
    28.Hospices are regulated by federal and state standards that are designed to ensure a baseline quality of care for the terminally ill and their families.?
    True   False
    29.Post funeral programs range from simply making referrals to a therapist or a local self-help group, to providing written material and/or a newsletter, to establishing a full bereavement follow-up program. They can be performed by the funeral director, a paraprofessional, or a mental health professional. They can be extensive or minimal.?
    True   False
    30.Effectiveness of bereavement aftercare programs is typically judged, to some extent, on their widespread use, and the fact that their attendance is continuously high.?
    True   False
    31.When we speak of “modern” death, what we are actually talking about is the late- twentieth-century reaction to and means of coping with death in all its aspects. Some ways of dying are more socially “acceptable” than others.?
    True   False
    32.Some deaths, such as those from AIDS, suicide, elective abortion, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), or murder, fall sufficiently so far outside of the mainstream that they inspire anxiety in all of us, and often fall into the category Worden identified as “unspeakable.”?
    True   False
    33.No death cause is more “significant” or more worthy of grief than any other.?
    True   False
    34.The stigma associated with AIDS remains so great that even obituary notices frequently list fictitious, more socially acceptable causes of death such as cancer or pneumonia rather than AIDS.?
    True   False
    35.May and Breme (1983) suggest that professionals working with SIDS families exercise caution when the couple expresses a desire to quickly have another child in an apparent effort to “replace” the dead baby. As it is impossible to replace a dead child, and being such a “replacement” baby may be damaging to the subsequent child, “the decision to have subsequent children should be made in a rational fashion after the emotional resolution of grief has been accomplished”.?
    True   False
    36.Particularly with respect to elderly Alzheimer’s survivors, social isolation may be exacerbated by a lack of mobility, either physical (due to illness or disability) or in transportation (due to an inability to drive or own a car, or perhaps to drive after dark, etc.). In such circumstances those who would provide social support—family, friends, clergy, funeral home director—may need to travel to or facilitate transportation for the bereaved in order for the bereaved to have access to that and other forms of support throughout the grieving process.?
    True   False
    37.It appears that, to a greater degree than other bereaved individuals, suicide survivors have a need to make sense of why their loved one chose to end his or her life, in order to fully heal and move forward.?
    True   False
    38.Many of the symptoms reported by bereaved people in the wake of murder or manslaughter can be seen as those of a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).?
    True   False
    39.Grief issues with respect to miscarriage appear to center around the degree to which the developing baby was perceived as “real” by its parents, particularly its mother. The more real the baby, the greater the sense of loss when the pregnancy terminates. For parents to whom the baby is not yet real, there may be little or no grief.?
    True   False
    40.The most important component in a successful, uncomplicated bereavement outcome is strong, ongoing social support. This kind of support is often precisely what is lacking in “nontraditional” deaths.?
    True   False
    41.It is not widely recognized that those professionals and volunteers to whom the care and ministry of dying people fall need to grieve as well.?
    True   False
    42.The investment death care professionals make is one of emotion as well as time and skill. It requires regularly confronting their own mortality, and when bonds are formed between caregiver and client, the death will provoke a grief response that must be acknowledged and processed.?
    True   False
    43.People whose jobs bring them into contact with pain, chronic illness, death, disaster, and dying are particularly susceptible to the phenomenon known as burnout.?
    True   False
    44.Canine (1994) states, “Burnout is rooted in an individual’s desire for meaningfulness.?
    True   False
    45.The consequences of burnout may include loss of health and well-being as well as a decline in professional performance.?
    True   False
    46.Dr. Ronald Barrett, a psychologist at Loyola Marymount University who gives seminars to health care workers treating and attending persons with AIDS, has coined the term “bereavement burnout”—a situation that develops when there is such an accumulation of unresolved, compounded grief that an individual may simply grow numb.?
    True   False
    47.Canine’s model illustrating management of burnout identifies five major arenas of life that death care professionals must attend to in order to minimize their potential or likelihood for burnout.?
    True   False
    48.Death care professionals need to be cognizant and aware of their spiritual filter, their purpose in life, and how to best exercise their spiritual muscles—whether through prayer, meditation, journal writing, communing with nature, self-examination and reflection, or practicing the tenets of a particular religious faith.?
    True   False
    49.Two very strong emotions that plague caregivers (and others) are anxiety and anger. In burnout management, it is important for individuals to recognize that these feelings are generally triggered by a lack of understanding or a lack of control.?
    True   False
    50.Delayed and unresolved grief will not stay swept under the rug indefinitely, and those most at risk for burnout are those who “care too much.” The answer is not to “pull back” and become emotionally unavailable to support your clients but instead to recognize and accept that caring and hurting go hand in hand.?
    True   False